Vaccination Policy

All visitors ages 12 and older must show proof of full vaccination against COVID-19. Visitors ages 5–11 must show proof of one dose. Read more >

Education Mission

The New-York Historical Society Education Division provides dynamic programming and curriculum resources for students and teachers in New York and beyond. Historical study sparks curiosity and creativity, promotes cultural understanding, and fosters an empowered citizenry to strengthen our democracy. Our staff of passionate professionals draws on our world-renowned collections to engage learners of all ages in the study of our collective past.

 

Attention educators! Subscribe to receive New-York Historical updates:

* indicates required

 

Education programs are made possible through endowments established by
National Endowment for the Humanities
The Hearst Foundations
The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation
Public funds are provided by
Institute of Museum and Library Services
New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council
Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer
New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature

Education programs at New-York Historical receive generous support from
The Achelis and Bodman Foundation
The Edith and Frances Mulhall Achilles Memorial Fund
Acorn Hill Foundation
Altman Foundation
Amazon
Barker Welfare Foundation
AT&T
Best Buy
Maggie & Robert Boroujerdi
Carnegie Corporation of New York
Con Edison
Deutsche Bank
Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation
Mark and Lori Fife
Henry Nias Foundation
Alan Shuch and Leslie Himmel
JPMorgan Chase Foundation
Keith Haring Foundation
IBM
Susan and Robert E. Klein
Caroline Lowndes Foundation
Ann Lozman
Dan W. Lufkin
Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation
The Michael Tuch Foundation
Sandra and Lowell Mintz
Consulate General of the Netherlands
New York Community Trust
Onassis Foundation USA
Heidi and Richard Ong
Pine Tree Foundation of New York
The Pinkerton Foundation
Jean Reid
Denice Rein
Richard Reiss
Rice Family Foundation
Sara Lee Schupf
The Scripps Family Fund for Education and the Arts
Robie Spector
Stavros Niarchos Foundation
Gillian V. and Robert Steel
Thompson Family Foundation
Tiger Baron Foundation
The Waterfall Family Foundation
Rachael Wells 
Winston Foundation
Marie and John Zimmermann Fund

SUPPORT THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Help us present groundbreaking exhibitions and develop educational programs about our nation's history for more than 200,000 schoolchildren annually.

DONATE TODAY

 

We currently offer FREE weekly professional development for teachers online. Interactive workshops take place on Wednesdays at 5 pm ET. "In Conversation," an informal discussion series, meets every Thursday at 6 pm ET. We hope to see you soon! 


December

Dreams of Liberation: Trans Women's Activism in the Stonewall Era
Wednesday, December 1, 5-6 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Engage with photographs, documents, and videos to learn more about the roles that trans women of color played in Stonewall and the rise of the LGBTQ+ movement that followed. 
Register here > 

In Conversation with the Smithsonian: Bringing the History of Money to Early Elementary Audiences
Thursday, December 2, 6-7pm EST

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
How can we make the history of money across world cultures meaningful to young learners? How can interactive experiences and object investigations make financial literacy accessible to our youngest learners? Join Orlando Serrano, manager of youth and teacher programs at the National Museum of American History (NMAH), and Ellen Feingold, curator at the NMAH, for a conversation about the development process for Really Big Money, a new numismatics exhibit for K-2 grade learners. We will reflect on the inspiration for the exhibit, discuss challenges for creating engaging and educational exhibits that are accessible for young learners, and share resources for you to use with your learning communities.
Register here > 

Women & the American Story Launch
Saturday, December 4, 1-4:30 pm ET

Participants will receive 3.5 CTLE hours
Two new units of Women & the American Story are ready for launch! Join us to celebrate the debut of Building a New Nation, 1776-1832 and Industry and Empire, 1866-1904 and all the exciting new women's history resources ready for your classroom. Following opening remarks by Vice President for Education Leslie Hayes, participants will have the opportunity to explore the new units in back-to-back workshops led by the curriculum writers:

  • Building a New Nation, 1776-1832 examines the ways women contributed to the foundation of the United States of America. In this workshop participants will get an introduction to the three sections of the unit and do an activity that examines the early debate over women's capacity for political engagement.
  • Industry and Empire, 1866-1904 explores women's experiences during a time of growing inequality influenced by industrialization and imperialism. In this workshop participants will receive an overview of the three unit sections and do an activity that explores the impact of American expansion on indigenous and immigrant women.

Register here >

Civics for the Classroom: Nation of Immigrants: A History of Immigration Laws
Wednesday, December 8, 5-6 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Learn about laws passed by Congress that decided who can immigrate to the United States.
Register here > 

In Conversation with Facing History and Ourselves: Identity, Memoir, and Storytelling
Thursday, December 9, 6-7pm EST

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Join Nicole Chung, author of the memoir All You Can Ever Know, for a discussion about growing up as a transracial adoptee and searching for the truth about herself and her Korean birth parents. Chung will explore how we construct our identities through the stories we are told and that we tell ourselves, as we seek an answer to the question, “Who am I?”
Register here > 

Educator Activists
Wednesday, December 15, 5-6 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Learn how women advocated for access to education in the 20th century by exploring resources from our Women & the American Story curriculum.
Register here >


January

Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Saturday, January 8, 1:00-2:30 pm ET
Participants will receive 1.5 CTLE hours
Explore the life and legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her role in the collective fight to expand civil rights in the United States. During this remote workshop, teachers will engage with materials from our Women & the American Story curriculum and view a live stream of the exhibit Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg before it closes to the public on January 23, 2022.Register here >

Art as Activism
Wednesday, January 12, 6-7 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Whether raising awareness or expressing diverse perspectives, art has been used as a powerful agent for change throughout U.S. history. Discover how various artists of the 20th century used their work as a form of activism.
Register here >

Black Women Abolitionists
Wednesday, January 19, 6-7 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Engage with photographs, documents, and video to learn more about the many ways that free and enslaved Black women fought to resist and dismantle systems of slavery in the United States. Reflect on why it is important to consider Black women’s perspectives, experiences, and contributions when teaching about abolition.
Register here >

Building a New Nation on Native Ground
Wednesday, January 26, 6-7 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Join historian Kathleen DuVal and Women & the American Story curriculum writer Allyson Schettino for an in depth discussion and workshop exploring how early US expansion impacted Indigenous communities in the heart of North America and how Indigenous people resisted the encroaching threat of white settlement.
Register here >


February

Women and American Imperialism
Wednesday, February 2, 6-7 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Learn how women were affected by and fought against U.S. imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by exploring resources from the unit Industry and Empire: 1866-1904 of our Women and the American Story curriculum.
Register here >

Black Women's Leadership and Civil Rights in the 1940s
Wednesday, February 9, 6-7 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Using materials from our Women & the American Story curriculum, explore how Black women were active agents of change during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1940s.
Register here >

In Conversation with Facing History and Ourselves: Teaching The Nanjing Atrocities: Crimes of War
Wednesday, February 16, 6-7 pm ET

Participants will receive 1 CTLE hour
Facing History and Ourselves will introduce its teaching resource The Nanjing Atrocities: Crimes of War, which details the Japanese occupation of the city of Nanjing, China, in 1937- 38, an essential but often overlooked part of World War II and an international war crime. We’ll explore what role Western imperialism played in shaping Japan and China’s developing sense of identity as nation states, question what justice and accountability look like in the aftermath of mass violence, and consider why difficult history is important to teach.
Register here >

Creative: Tronvig Group